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Harry M. Clor

Distinguished Professor of History, Kenyon College

 
Professor Harry M. Clor at Kenyon College | Opine Needles Featured AuthorHarry M. Clor, Professor Emeritus, taught Kenyon students, and perhaps a few faculty members, too, for three and a half decades. In matters of political correctness he comprised, with a few other colleagues, The Loyal Opposition, especially in the grim years of Kulturkampf. The author of books and articles, his latest publication is On Moderation: Defending Ancient Virtue in the Modern World. More important than his publications was his dedication to teaching. His clarity of exposition, craftsmanship in leading discussion, and probing insights into classical text and theoretical as well as practical political issues, allowed students to see his mind and pedagogy unfold. Grateful for his contributions to their intellectual development, a group of former students endowed a chair in his honor. Upon his retirement the chair continued, named after him. Former conservative Democratic Congressman Zack Space said that he learned from Professor Clor that “there is strength in moderation as taught by Plato.” Professor Clor is yet another example of a small minority of dissident professors who resisted the censorial bulldozer and soft-core political authoritarianism whilst simultaneously contributing to students’ critical awareness, offering them a road less travelled – but none the less, by example, patience, and open-mindedness to alternative views – a road worthwhile.

He received the MA and PhD in political science from the University of Chicago. His courses on constitutional history and Quest for Justice contributed to the overall strength of the teaching and learning environment, making the political science department one of the strongest teaching-oriented departments at Kenyon.

  • Sharon Kass

    Thanks for your OBSCENITY AND PUBLIC MORALITY. It was excerpted in a text book I have.
    It may interest you to know that “gay” is parent-caused, preventable, and treatable. Some Americans are working to get that recognized. Never say die!
    –Sharon Kass
    Washington, D.C.